Glossary

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Absorbency – this is the amount of fluid that a product absorbs. It is in fluid ounces. A fluid ounce to cups to bladder size conversion chart can be found here.

Adult Cloth Diapers – These are usually reusable diapers with tabs that can be washed 200-300 times, depending on the product. They are an inexpensive (long-term) way to treat urinary incontinence. They are a lot like a big cloth baby diaper. They often use snaps or Velcro to get a snug fit. An example is the Ibex Ultra-Fitted Briefs

Adult Diaper – This is a general term for a pull-up, diaper with tabs, incontinence underwear, belted undergarment, or swim diaper that protects the person against incontinence. They are made to absorb urine and/or bowel and treat urinary and bowel incontinence.

Adult Diaper Cover – this is a cover that goes over the top of regular incontinence products. It is reusable and catches any access liquid. Some people feel they give added security.

Bariatric Products – see plus-sized diapers

Belted Undergarment – this is a belt with a large incontinence pad, usually used if the person has a brace or wires connected to them. Some other people prefer them too.

Bladder size – the amount a bladder can hold. For adults, it is 16 fluid ounces. Click here to see a comparison chart.

Booster Pad – This is a pad that adds absorption to an existing incontinence product. Normal incontinence pads are waterproof on one side. Booster pads are not. They absorb their fluid, then pass the rest on to the diaper or brief with tabs, providing more absorption, especially at night.

Bowel Incontinence Product – these are products specifically designed for bowel incontinence. They are often made to catch both urine and bowel. The section on this site for them can be found here.

Brief – see diaper with tabs

Complete Incontinence – see full incontinence

Diaper with Tabs - This is an incontinence product, often for heavy or overnight incontinence, that is like a pull-up but has tabs on the side for a snugger fit. This product can also be taken off without removing clothing.

Disposable Diapers – any adult diaper that is disposable as opposed to reusable products.

Disposable Underpad – this is a disposable pad that is placed on the bedding to protect it and absorb any excess fluid loss.

Fecal Incontinence Product – see bowel incontinence product

Fit – this is how well a product conforms to your body and size.

Fluid ounce – a measurement amount that is used for absorbency in an incontinence product. Click here to see a comparison chart.

Full Incontinence – This means at least 16 ounces of fluid (a full bladder) per bladder loss.

Heavy Incontinence - a product, usually a diaper with tabs or pull up underwear product, that holds up to 16 fluid ounces of liquid per bladder loss during the day. Click here for a fluid ounce to the bladder to the cup's conversion chart. Click here to see our heavy incontinence section.

Incontinence Pad – a pad that catches fluid for people with light incontinence. These go in regular underwear usually.

Incontinence Panty – this looks like a women's panty, often with lace or a bow, and they double as light to moderate incontinence products.

Incontinence Product – This is a more general term for adult diapers, that also includes pads, underpads, cover-ups, and peripheral skin and cleaning products.

Incontinence Underwear – this is the general term for women’s incontinence panties and men’s incontinence underwear, usually for light to moderate incontinence.

Light Incontinence – a product, many times a pad, that holds 0-4 fluid ounces of urine. Click here for a fluid ounce to the bladder to the cup's conversion chart. Click here to see our light incontinence section.

Level of Incontinence – This is the level of incontinence that a product is ranked for, whether it be light (0-4 fluid ounces of containment), moderate (4-10 fluid ounces of containment, heavy (up to 16 fluid ounces of containment), or overnight (16 fluid ounces of containment or more at night). Each product says what its level of incontinence is for, and a section for determining what product to use is here. Click here for a fluid ounce to cups to bladder size comparison chart.

Moderate Incontinence – a product, usually a pad or incontinence underwear product, that holds 4-10 fluid ounces of liquid per bladder loss. Click here for a fluid ounce to the bladder to the cup's conversion chart. Click here to see our moderate incontinence section.

Nighttime Incontinence – This is 16 fluid ounces or more of fluid loss at night and the products that go with it. Nighttime incontinence normally requires a diaper with tabs or a pull uprated for that level.

Odor Control – this is the type and amount of odor catching in a given product.

Overnight Incontinence – a product, usually a diaper with tabs or pull up underwear product, that holds 16 fluid ounces or more of liquid per bladder loss at night. Click here for a fluid ounce to the bladder to the cup's conversion chart. Click here to see our overnight incontinence section.

Plus-Sized Diapers – this is a larger size adult diaper product. The plus-size category can be found here.

Pull up – This is an incontinence product, often for heavy or overnight incontinence, that looks and feels more like regular underwear and pulls up like a pair of underwear. This is the most common type of product for full incontinence, probably because it seems to keep dignity better.

Puppy Pad – this is a pad that protects an incontinent dog or puppy needing help with potty training. Puppies have these problems too!

Reusable Adult Diapers – This is a general term that includes adult cloth diapers, incontinence underwear, and cover-ups.

Reusable Products – This is a general term that includes reusable adult diapers as well as reusable pads and underpads.

Reusable Underpad – this is a reusable pad that is placed on bedding to protect it from excess fluid loss. It doesn’t bunch up as easily as the disposable type, and it can be washed and reused.

Stress Incontinence – This is a light incontinence condition that usually makes people lose a small amount of fluid when they cough, sneeze, exercise, etc. It can usually be treated with a simple pad.

Swim Diaper – this is an adult diaper that helps bowel incontinent people go back in the pool. One version, the So Secure swim diaper, also protects against slight urinary incontinence when tested carefully and sized correctly.

Tab – the tab on the side of a diaper with tabs. They are what holds that product snugly. You may be more familiar with these baby diapers.

Tear-away sides – on a pull-up, this means that you don’t have to remove clothing to take it off – you can just tear it off.

Urge Incontinence – This is the type of incontinence where the person suddenly needs to go to the bathroom and cannot always make it. It is usually light to moderate incontinence but can be more dramatic.

Youth Diapers – this is an adult diaper made for youth. The youth section can be found here.

 
Attribution: Image by Pexels from Pixabay